CW Calls now in our Obsession Shop!

Stop Spraying New Brunswick posts Open Letter

On December 6th 2016, MLA David Coon of the New Brunswick Green Party tabled a second batch of signatures to the Stop Spraying New Brunswick petition regarding the use of glyphosate.  On this date, 13,451 signatures were included, and as of that day, 27,225 NB residents have signed a petition requesting the province stop the application of Glyphosate and other “pesticides” in our forests.  This is the largest petition ever tabled in New Brunswick.  Signature collection is still ongoing, and there is a Facebook group with approximately 14,000 members engaging in conversations about how to convince government to stop this practice. 

New Brunswick once boasted a thriving deer population of over 250,000 animals, and now have dropped more than 70%.  While population declines in other jurisdictions can point to the overharvest of does and breakouts of EHD or CWD as causes; New Brunswick has never seen a single case of CWD or EHD, and the official position on the decline is to blame hard winters and coyotes.   There are many, former New Brunswick deer biologist Rod Cumberland included, who believe the lack of suitable habitat and food caused by monoculture plantations and massive clearcuttings are directly responsible for this. 

In 2014, Graham Forbes, a forestry professor and wildlife ecologist at University of New Brunswick expressed his shock at the current forestry operations.  Incidentally, in combination with the province of Maine and Biologists with the Department Energy and Resource Development, Mr Forbes is currently participating in a study on Deer in New Brunswick using GPS collars.   However, Deer are not the only ones affected by the forestry practices, and articles from the CBC speaks to the impact clear cutting and plantations in New Brunswick has on bird populations and this article from 2006 spoke to the difficulties Pine Martens and other species face due to logging operations.    Dr. James P. Goltz, one of New Brunswick's leading botanists, wrote a report in 2014 noting that several plant species at risk are in danger of extirpation due to the updated forestry management practices. 

The 2014 Forestry plan promises to drastically reshape our old growth forests into plantations

Under the terms of the 2014 Forestry Plan, New Brunswick committed to reducing the percentage of New Brunswick forests which are considered “Old Growth” from 26% down to 10% and increasing the percentage of New Brunswick into Monoculture Plantations to 21%.  If that number seems high to you, you’re not alone.  The GNB published vision under the new plan for NB Forests is to have more than 1/5 of our Acadian Forests turned into single species tree farming operations.  If you’re interested in reading about Why Old Trees Matter, we suggest you check out this excellent report by Nature NB.

On December 19th, Rick Doucet, Minister for Energy and Resource Development responded to the petition in an official mailing to Mr Coon.  You can read his official mailing here.  This week, Stop Spraying New Brunswick responded in kind, creating an Open Letter to Minister Doucet which we would like to share with you (available below).  One of the group Organizers, Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, had this to say:

“Voters all over NB are concerned about the effects of forest and NB Power herbicide spraying on wildlife, jobs and biodiversity. 27,225 signatures on an ongoing written petition should warrant more than the same dismissive response received twice now from the NB Department of Energy and Resource Development (DERD). The group Stop Spraying NB has requested a meeting with Minister Doucet to make a presentation about serious concerns regarding public forest land and NB Power rights of way spraying with herbicides. The awareness and concerns are growing every day. This issue is not going away, and we want to be heard”

You can find more information about this important issue by following SSNB on Facebook or checking out their website - www.stopsprayingnb.ca, and by reading the articles we have previously published.  We would love to hear your opinions on the matter, join the conversation on Facebook and let us know what’s on your mind.  Do the current Forestry Practices in New Brunswick go too far, or are they required for economic prosperity?

---- Open Letter in Both English and French Follows ---

March 16, 2017


Minister Rick Doucet, Minister DERD
Agricultural Research Station (Experimental Farm)
P. O. Box 6000
Fredericton, NB
E3B 5H1
Canada

Dear Honourable Rick Doucet,


Mr. David Coon’s office has forwarded your letter in response to petition 3, which was tabled in the Legislature on December 6, 2016 by Mr. David Coon (MLA Fredericton South) to our group, Stop Spraying NB. We have reviewed your letter and have prepared a response.

Please review our comments and references. Our group strongly stands by our request to stop herbicide spraying of our Crown forest land and NB Power rights of way. New Brunswick tax payers are paying $2.2M annually for this spray program with no benefit in return: less jobs, less revenue for the province and loss of biodiversity.

Stop Spraying NB and allies request a meeting to make a presentation to you and your department at your earliest convenience. We will need one hour to allow enough time to cover our arguments and answer questions.


Regards,

Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy on behalf of SSNB
Ms. Jean MacDonald on behalf of Écovie 
Stop Spraying New Brunswick (SSNB)
P.O. Box 20313, King’s Place Post Office
Fredericton, NB
E3B 0N7


March 16, 2017

RESPONSE to Minister Rick Doucet’s letter dated Dec. 21, 2016, regarding “petition 3” (re: Herbicide Spraying) which was tabled in the Legislature on December 6, 2016 by Mr. David Coon, MLA Fredericton South.

SSNB addresses each point made by Minister Doucet in this response: 


Minister Doucet: “Our forestry sector is important to the New Brunswick economy. More than 20,000 New Brunswickers put food on the table each day because of jobs in forestry.”

SSNB’s response:
The proponents of the discontinuation of chemical herbicides are very aware of the forestry
sector’s major role in the economy of New Brunswick, and in fact suggest alternatives that
would increase employment such as the use of mechanical silviculture. This in turn would put more food on the table of New Brunswick residents. Thinning also leads to more biodiversity, and a sustainable forest sequesters a considerable amount of carbon which along with other measures plays a role in climate change mitigation (Jared 2010).

Minister Doucet: “A very small portion of Crown forests gets treated annually. The use of herbicide is very selective and generally done once or twice during the forest’s lifecycle.”

SSNB’s response:
Could the Minister be more specific regarding the exact amount of crown (unceded) land that is being “selectively” sprayed e.g. in terms of percentages? In fact there are 13,000 hectares of forest plantation sprayed in NB annually, at a cost of over 2 million taxpayer dollars. New Brunswick is ranked second after Ontario in the the amount of glyphosate used for forest management ( Report prepared for NB OCMOH on glyphosate). In 2014, 28% of the glyphosate used in forestry in Canada was sprayed in New Brunswick alone. In terms of selective spraying, environmental groups have heard of reckless spraying tactics near lakes and cottages which have put residents at risk. The use of glyphosate also occurs near sugar bushes, which could compromise their ability to be considered organic suppliers. Through the Right to Information Act it has become evident that some parcels of land have been sprayed up to three times.

Minister Doucet: “Making sure our forests are productive is vital to having a competitive and viable forest industry. As a result of our management practices, New Brunswick continues to have a vibrant and and healthy forests and forest ecosystem. The vast majority (more than 75%) of our forest regenerate naturally. Less than 25% of the areas harvested are regenerated through planting a variety of tree seedlings.”

SSNB’s response:
The Province of Quebec’s forest industry has remained competitive in the world market without the use of herbicides, and it has used selective cuts to promote a sustainable forest with enhanced biodiversity. In New Brunswick the actual percentage of Crown/unceded land targeted, harvested and converted to plantations (as permitted by the 2014 Forest Strategy) is 40% and not 25%. It is important to note that the most fertile, most productive soils and sites are always targeted to be planted and sprayed versus being allowed to regenerate naturally. Less than half of the remaining 60% grows browse suitable to sustain deer, as has been found in two independent reviews by the past two deer biologists at DERD. It is common knowledge that the deer population in northern New Brunswick has been drastically reduced. Access to food sources for deer has been greatly reduced over the years, because clear-cuts sprayed with herbicides and converted into plantations (versus natural regeneration) do not provide such resources. 

Minister Doucet: “We are using a number of new technologies and modern techniques to better manage our forests. Our seedlings are third generation plus trees with improved growing characteristics. Herbicide is only one tool used to help these planted trees survive the early competitive vegetation that would otherwise prevent then from growing freely.”

SSNB’s response:
It needs to be pointed out that the forestry companies are using the most productive forest land found in the Crown/unceded Acadian Forest, which could also explain the improved growth seen in those areas. If the public was aware that the most productive forest land is being turned into plantations as opposed to allowing natural regeneration,: they would be even more opposed to this forest ‘management’ approach. Additionally, the use of new technology to improve the rate of growth of seedlings is not conducive to the regeneration of an original and natural Acadian forest. This remains important to many New Brunswickers as well as to aboriginal people. In a mixed managed forest, seedlings of an appropriate height would grow without the use of chemical herbicides. Again, the bottom line remains; money takes precedence over legitimate concerns of the people who have entrusted this Department to prioritize their best interests. Instead, our government is perceived as catering to big corporations whose only motivation is to make a profit on the backs of the taxpayers of New Brunswick.

We do not consider poplar, maple, alder, and oak trees to be weeds, neither are berry bushes, dogwood or any deciduous tree. They are a part of a natural ecosystem that provides jobs through sugar bushes, the production of cabinets, hardwood floors and furniture. They also provide food for foragers, animal and human alike and habitat for fauna and flora. Conifer- dominated plantations in central and northern Europe are associated with relatively low ecological values, and in some cases, may be vulnerable to disturbances caused by anthropogenic climate change. (Felton 2010).

Minister Doucet: “The Department of Energy and Resource Development is committed to sharing information about herbicides in forestry to address New Brunswickers’ concerns. We are working with our partners and some of the countries leading scientists to do this. In fact a lot of great information on this topic can be found at www.ForestInfo.ca.”

SSNB’s response:
SSNB insists that all current research done by independent scientists should be included on www.forestinfo.ca. When we investigate your suggested web site www.ForestInfo.ca, we only find referenced the exact same government-sponsored scientists as those who toured New Brunswick pontificating the virtues of clear cuts, and the use of herbicides; this website is clearly biased in favour of one point of view. Are the scientists referenced on www.forestinfo.ca the only “specialists” in Canada? New Brunswick researchers and scientists, such as Dr. Rod Savage, Dr. André Villard, Dr. David Coombs, retired  NB Deer Biologist Rod Cumberland and many other in-province experts view the material on www.forestinfo.ca as biased, unscientific, and an insult to the average New Brunswicker’s intelligence. Would it be possible for the Minister to provide us with the government- sponsored 2 year studies performed on mice? Apparently these studies showed that glyphosate posed no negative impacts on its subjects? Would it be possible to establish the validity and reliability of such experiments by independent scientists? 

Minister Doucet: “On May 16, 2016, The World Health Organization , in conjunction with the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization reiterated its findings that glyphosate is unlikely to to pose a carcinogenic or genotoxic risk to humans from exposure through diet. Other world organizations have made multiple, similar statements.”

SSNB’s response:
In March 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) stated that glyphosate is a probable cause of cancer (Guyton, Kathryn et al, Nov. 2015. Despite the World Health Organization’s (WHO), and the European Food and Safety Authorities’ (EFSA) withdrawal of this classification in November 2015, the findings of the IARC resonated at an international level. The WHO and the EFSA were quoted as saying that glyphosate is “unlikely” to be carcinogenic for humans. The word “unlikely” does not inspire  confidence. The fact remains that the scientists on the IARC panel were vetted to dismiss possible bias, and represented a wide range of qualified scientists as explained during a CBC radio show by Dr McLaughlin, a Canadian environmental health epidemiologist, who served on this panel. Despite the fact that research into health effects of glyphosate is in its infancy and there is a need for research to duplicate evidence of the effects of glyphosate, there still remain many documents written by reputable scientists which are available for government scrutiny. Can Health Canada or Environment Canada do the same for us, or is this considered to be confidential? When Dr. Dean Thompson, a research scientist and Environmental Chemist, was asked if he believed that all scientists who had found health hazards through their rigorous and peer- reviewed studies should be considered credible, he answered that there were only a “a handful” of credible studies. Is this arrogance or ignorance? By contrast, the body of studies referenced by Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) staff regarding toxicology are largely unpublished, non-peer- reviewed and submitted by the corporations themselves. Only seven of the 118 studies used to assess the toxicology of glyphosate were actually published studies that were not provided by the corporations, and of those seven studies, only one was considered by the IARC (Ecojustice 2015). This fact highlights Dr Thompson’s misconception that all studies considered by the PMRA are credible, peer reviewed research.

Minister Doucet: “Glyphosate herbicides continue to be safely used in forestry and agriculture around the world as stated in a recent review by the Acting Chief Medical Officer, and supported by Ontario’s Chief Science Officer and Senior Scientist.”

SSNB’s response: 
SSNB needs to correct your statement regarding New Brunswick’s Acting Chief Medical Officer. Dr. Russell did not look into safety of glyphosate but simply looked at what other jurisdictions do and how much New Brunswick uses.
The majority of studies that Health Canada has relied on are 90- day studies performed by Monsanto, which are toxicity studies, and not long- term studies of health exposure. These are less than conclusive and do not show the long term effects of exposure to glyphosate. Furthermore, an increasing number of countries are banning or at least partially banning the use of glyphosate due to health concerns. These include Argentina, Malta, the Netherlands and Sri Lanka. The Province of Quebec has banned forest spraying with glyphosate since 2001, and Nova Scotia no longer subsidizes industry spraying forests with glyphosate. In 2015 the European Union denied Monsanto’s request to commit to a 10- year extension of the use of glyphosate. Due to concerns voiced by an increasing number of scientists and growing public pressure the European Union announced instead an eighteen  month extension to allow for further research and the review of existing research. 
In 2012 Dr. Seralini published an independent study in a well- respected journal which documented the negative effects related to the use of glyphosate on rats over a period of 700 days. The results showed alarming rates of tumours and negative effects on livers, kidneys, and organs associated with the endocrine system (Seralini 2014). There was an immediate response by Monsanto, who managed to implant a scientist with no background in plant studies or pesticides into the senior editorial board of that scientific journal. Within a few weeks Dr. Seralini’s article was retracted by the same journal that had once found it appropriate for publication. The study was republished in 2014 in Environmental Science Europe, after the scientific community voiced its anger with corporate interference. If a multi-million dollar company has tentacles that can reach into the world of science, can they not reach into government agencies and policymakers? A paper published by Antoniou et al. (2012) shows clearly how regulatory processes ignore science and are plagued by industry pressure. Canadians and indigenous people have very little trust in government agencies. Perhaps it is time to listen to the people and forego the blatant lies and manipulations of industry and some Government sectors. The Precautionary Principle states “when the health of humans and the environment are at stake, it may not be necessary to wait for scientific certainty to take protective action”(Science and Environmental Health Network. Precautionary Principle. August 11,2016, p. 1). The public of Quebec voiced their concerns and the Quebec Government listened. To date 27,225 citizens (5% of the population) of New Brunswick have voiced their concerns through petitions seeking a ban on glyphosate spraying. Maybe it’s time that the government listens.

Minister Doucet: “I can assure you that the Government and the forest industry are continually evaluating ways to minimize the amount of herbicide needed to effectively control competing vegetation.” 

SSNB’s response:
Why won’t the government and forestry sector invite environmental groups, forestry experts, woodlot owners and local community stakeholder groups to the table to discuss alternatives to spraying? These groups and individuals have the experience, knowledge, and expertise to participate in discussions which would identify viable alternatives to the use of herbicides. The people and groups consulted  should not be motivated by politics or monetary benefits in providing expertise and original solutions.

Minister Doucet: “The principle of integrated vegetation management along with better education and awareness programs will help alleviate concerns over responsible forest management.”

SSNB’s response:
The amount of spraying in New Brunswick is perceived by the public as being hazardous to the health of all living creatures, and it is believed that the amount used is far greater than the Government of New Brunswick has stated. Environmental groups across the province are committed to promoting education and public awareness of this threat to their wellbeing. Applying the precautionary principle would mandate a moratorium on spraying herbicides, such as glyphosate, until an independent commission was able to determine its safety. This would provide time to review current and independent studies as well as networking with counties who have banned the use of glyphosate. As always, environmental groups, forestry experts, community stakeholders and woodlot owners would support and provide any assistance required to facilitate this approach. There are many people who did not sign the petition for fear of repercussions from their employer. On election day 2018 the New Brunswick voters may very well vote with their conscience, behind the safety of a piece of cardboard, for political candidates who will stand up for constituents. Environmental and other advocacy groups will work hard to inform voters about what is best for them, their children and their children‘s children’s future. 

SSNB and its allies are requesting a meeting with the Minister as soon as possible to further discuss issues surrounding the use of glyphosate.

Respectfully,

Stop Spraying NB (SSNB)


References:
Gordon B. Bonan. Forests and Climate Change: Forcings, Feedbacks, and the Climate Benefits of Forests.Science 2008 p 1444.

Ecojustice, Canadian Environmental Law Association, Wilderness Committee, Ontario Nature Canadian Physicians for the Environment, Equiterre, David Suzuki Foundation and Friends of the Earth, in a letter to the Honourable Rona Ambrossse, Minister of Health ,Health Canada June 12,2015.

Felton et al. Replacing coniferous monocultures with mixed species production stands: An assessment of the potential benefits for forest biodiversity in northern Europe. Forest Ecology 260, 2010 p. 939.

Guyton, Kathryn et al on behalf of the International Agency for the Research on Cancer Monograph working group March 2015.

FAQS. Science and Environmental Health Network. Precautionary Principle. August 11,2016, p. 1.

Serelini et al. Long term toxicity of a Roundup herbicide and Roundup-tolerant genetically modified maize. Environment Science Europe. 26:14, 2014 pp 3-17. 

Results of the OCMOH Action Plan on Glyphosate, A report prepared for the Acting Chief Medical Officer of Health (July 29, 2016) page 6

Antoniou, et al: Teratogenic effects of glyphosate-based herbicides: Divergence of regulatory decisions from scientific evidence. Journal of Environmental and Analytical Toxicology S:4 (2012) 

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, Fredericton: (506)292-7503
Francine Levesque, Kedgwick : (506)284-2769

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Le 16 mars, 2017

M. le Ministre Rick Doucet
Ministre de l’Energie et du développement des ressources
C.P. 6000
Frédéricton, NB
E3B 5H1

Honorable Rick Doucet,

Le bureau de M. David Coon nous a fait parvenir votre lettre en réponse à la Pétition 3 qui fut présentée à l’Assemblée législative du Nouveau-Brunswick le 6 décembre, 2016 par M. David Coon, député de Frédéricton-sud, pour notre groupe Stop Spraying NB. Nous avons révisé votre lettre et avons préparé une réponse. 

S.V.P. prenez connaissance de nos commentaires et références. Notre groupe tient toujours fortement à sa demande pour que cesse l’arrosage d’herbicides sur les terres de la Couronne et sous les lignes d’Énergie NB. Les payeurs de taxes du NB payent 2.2 millions annuellement pour ce programme d’épandage d’herbicides sans aucun bénéfice en retour : moins d’emplois, moins de revenus pour la province et perte de la biodiversité.

Stop Spraying NB et ses alliés demandent une rencontre afin de vous faire une présentation à vous et votre Ministère le plus rapidement possible, selon vos disponibilités. Nous aurons besoin d’une heure pour avoir le temps nécessaire pour vous présenter nos arguments et répondre à vos questions.

Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy pour Stop Spraying NB
Mad. Jean MacDonald pour EcoVie
Stop Spraying NB
P.O. Box 20313, King’s Place Post Office
Frédéricton, NB
E3B 0N7



Le 16 mars 2017

RÉPONSE à la lettre du Ministre Rick Doucet datée du 21 décembre 2016, concernant la «Pétition 3» (re: Arrosage d’herbicides) déposée à l’Assemblée législative le 6 décembre 2016 par M. David Coon, député de Fredericton-Sud.

SSNB traite de chaque point soulevé par le Ministre Doucet dans sa réponse:

Ministre Doucet: “Le secteur forestier est important pour l’économie du Nouveau-Brunswick. Plus de 20 000 personnes de la province gagnent leur vie grâce à la foresterie.”

Réponse de SSNB:
Les promoteurs de l'arrêt de l’arrosage des herbicides sont très conscients du rôle important du secteur forestier dans l'économie du Nouveau-Brunswick et, en fait, suggèrent des solutions qui augmenteraient le nombre des emplois comme l'utilisation de la sylviculture mécanique. Cela mettrait plus de nourriture sur la table des résidents du Nouveau-Brunswick. L'éclaircissage conduit également à une plus grande biodiversité et une forêt durable séquestrant une quantité considérable de carbone qui, avec d’autres mesures, joue un rôle dans l'atténuation des changements climatiques. (Jared 2010).

Ministre Doucet: “On ne traite qu’une très petite portion des forêts de la Couronne chaque année. La pulvérisation d’herbicides est très sélective et n’est généralement fait qu’une ou deux fois au cours du cycle de vie d’une forêt.”

Réponse de SSNB:
Le Ministre pourrait-il être plus précis en ce qui concerne la quantité exacte de terres de la Couronne (non-cédées) qui sont pulvérisées “sélectivement”, par ex. En pourcentage? En fait, 13 000 hectares de plantations forestières sont pulvérisés chaque année au N.-B., au coût de plus de 2 millions de dollars, payés par les contribuables. Le Nouveau-Brunswick occupe le deuxième rang après l'Ontario quant à la quantité de glyphosate utilisée pour la gestion forestière (Rapport préparé pour le BMHC NB sur le glyphosate). En 2014, 28% du glyphosate utilisé en foresterie au Canada a été pulvérisé au Nouveau-Brunswick. En ce qui concerne la pulvérisation sélective, les groupes environnementaux ont entendu parler de tactiques de pulvérisation imprudentes près des lacs et des chalets qui ont mis les résidents en danger. L'utilisation du glyphosate se produit également près des érablières, ce qui pourrait compromettre leur capacité à être considérés comme des producteurs biologiques. Grâce à la Loi sur le droit à l’information, il est devenu évident que certaines parcelles de terrain ont été pulvérisées jusqu’à trois fois.

Ministre Doucet: “Il est essentiel de veiller à ce que nos forêts soient productives si nous voulons avoir une industrie forestière compétitive et viable. En raison de nos pratiques de gestion, le Nouveau-Brunswick continue d'avoir des forêts et des écosystèmes forestiers sains et dynamiques. La vaste majorité (plus de 75%) de nos forêt se régénèrent naturellement. Moins de 25% des superficies récoltées sont régénérées par la plantation de divers semis d’arbres.”

Réponse de SSNB:
L’industrie forestière de la province de Québec est demeurée compétitive sur le marché mondial sans lherbicides et elle a utilisé des coupes sélectives pour promouvoir une forêt durable avec une biodiversité accrue. Au Nouveau-Brunswick, le pourcentage réel de terres de la Couronne/non cédées/ qui sont ciblées, récoltées et converties en plantations (tel que permis par la Stratégie forestière de 2014) est de 40% et non de 25%. Il est important de noter que les sols et les sites les plus fertiles et les plus productifs sont toujours ciblés pour être plantés et arrosés par rapport à la régénération naturelle. Moins de la moitié des 60% restants produit du broutage convenable pour soutenir les cerfs, comme cela a été constaté dans deux examens indépendants par les deux derniers biologistes en charge des chevreuils au Ministère de l’Energie et développement des Ressources. Ce n’est pas un secret pour personne que la population de cerfs du nord du Nouveau-Brunswick a été considérablement réduite. L’accès aux sources de nourriture pour les chevreuils a été considérablement réduit au fil des ans, car les coupes à blanc arrosées avec des herbicides et transformées en plantations (par opposition à la régénération naturelle) ne fournissent pas de telles
ressources.

Ministre Doucet: “Nous avons recours à un grand nombre de nouvelles technologies et de techniques modernes pour mieux gérer nos forêts. Nos semis sont des arbres de troisième génération ou plus dont les caractéristiques de croissance sont améliorées. Les herbicides ne sont qu’un des outils dont nous nous servons pour aider les arbres plantés à survivre à la végétation concurrente qui autrement les empêcherait de se développer librement.”

Réponse de SSNB: 
Il est important de noter que les compagnies forestières utilisent les terres les plus productives trouvées parmi les terres de la Couronne/ non-cédées de la forêt acadienne ce qui pourrait aussi expliquer l’amélioration de la croissance observée dans ces zones. Si la population était consciente que les terres les plus productives sont converties en plantations contrairement à encourager la régénération naturelle, elle serait encore plus opposée à cette méthode de ‘gestion’. En outre, le fait d’ utiliser de nouvelles technologies pour améliorer le taux de croissance des semis est non propice à la régénération naturelle et originale de la forêt acadienne. Ceci est d’une grande importance pour beaucoup de néo-brunswickois ainsi que pour les peuples autochtones. Dans l’aménagement d’une forêt mixte, les semis d’une hauteur appropriée peuvent croître sans utiliser d’herbicides chimiques. Encore une fois, la ligne de fond reste la même : l’argent prend préséance sur les légitimes préoccupations des gens qui ont confié à ce ministère leur meilleur intérêt. Plutôt, votre gouvernement est perçue comme favorisant les grandes industries dont la seule motivation est de faire des profits sur le dos des contribuables du Nouveau-Brunswick.

Nous ne considérerons pas les peupliers, les érables, les aulnes et les chênes comme des mauvaises herbes, ni les arbres à petits fruits ou tout arbre à feuilles. Ils font partie d’un écosystème naturel qui fournit des emplois par la production de sirop d’érable, la confection d’armoires, de planchers de bois franc et de meubles. Ils fournissent aussi la nourriture pour les animaux et les humains ainsi que l’ habitat pour la faune et la flore. Les plantations composées majoritairement de conifères dans le Nord et le Centre de l’Europe sont associés à une valeur écologique relativement faible et, dans certains cas, peuvent être plus vulnérables aux perturbations causées par les changements climatiques anthropologiques. (Felton 2010).

Ministre Doucet: “Le ministère du Développement de l’énergie et des ressources s’est engagé à diffuser l’ information sur les herbicides utilisés en foresterie afin de répondre aux préoccupations des gens du Nouveau-Brunswick à ce sujet. Pour ce faire, nous collaborons avec nos partenaires et certains des plus grands scientifiques au pays. En fait, on peut trouver de très bons renseignements à ce sujet sur le site Web : www.forestinfo.ca.”

Réponse de SSNB: 
SSNB insiste sur le fait que toute recherche actuelle faite par des scientifiques indépendants devrait être incluse sur www.forestinfo.ca. Quand nous étudions votre site web suggéré www.forestinfo.ca, nous retrouvons seulement les références des mêmes scientifiques qui ont fait une tournée du Nouveau-Brunswick, mettant beaucoup d’importance sur les vertus des coupes à blanc et l’usage des herbicides; ce site web est clairement biaisé en faveur d’un seul point de vue. Est-ce que les scientifiques dont on fait référence sur www.forestinfo.ca sont les seuls ‘spécialistes’ au Canada? Les chercheurs et scientifiques du NB, tels que le Dr. Rod Savage, Dr. André Villard, Dr. David Coombs, l’ancien biologiste en chef du cheptel de chevreuils au NB Rod Cumberland et beaucoup d’autres experts de la province considèrent le contenu du site www.forestinfo.ca comme partial, non scientifique, et un insulte à l’intelligence moyenne des résidents du Nouveau-Brunswick. Serait-il possible pour le Ministre de nous fournir les études de 2 ans parrainées par notre gouvernement effectuées sur les souris? Apparemment, ces études ont démontré que le glyphosate n’a eu aucun impact négatif sur les sujets. Serait-il possible d’établir la validité et fiabilité de telles expériences par des scientifiques indépendants? 

Ministre Doucet: “Le 16 mai, 2016, l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé, de concert avec l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture des Nations Unis, a réitéré ses conclusions selon lesquelles il est peu probable que le glyphosate pose un risque cancérigène ou génotoxique pour l’être humain à la suite d’une exposition alimentaire. D’autres organisations mondiales ont fait de multiples déclarations semblables.”

Réponse SSNB: 
En mars 2015, l’Agence internationale de recherche sur le cancer (AIRC) a déclaré que le glyphosate est une cause probable de cancer (Guyton, Kathryn et al, nov. 2015). Malgré le fait que l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé et l’Autorité européenne de sécurité des aliments (AESA) se sont retirées de cette classification en novembre 2015, les conclusions de l’AIRC ont résonné au niveau international. L’OMS et l’AESA ont été citées disant que le glyphosate est 'peu probable' cancérigène pour les humains. Le mot 'peu probable' ne nous inspire pas confiance. Les faits demeurent que les scientifiques du Centre International de recherche sur le cancer ont été examinés de près afin d’éliminer tout parti pris possible et représentaient une large gamme de scientifiques qualifiés comme l’a expliqué dans une entrevue à la radio de CBC le Dr. McLaughlin, un épidémiologiste canadien en santé de l'environnement, qui a siégé sur ce panel. Malgré le fait que les effets du glyphosate sur la santé sont à leur début et qu’il existe un besoin de recherches supplémentaires afin de confirmer les évidences des effets du glyphosate, plusieurs documents écrits par des scientifiques réputés sont disponibles pour un examen minutieux par le gouvernement. Est-ce que Santé Canada ou Environnement Canada pourrait faire pareil pour nous, ou est-ce considéré comme confidentiel? Quand le Dr. Dean Thompson, un chercheur scientifique et chimiste en environnement, a été demandé s’il croyait que tous les scientifiques qui avaient trouvé des risques au niveau de la santé dans des études rigoureuses et révisées par les pairs devraient être considérés comme crédibles, il a répondu que c’est seulement 'une poignée' de ces études qui sont crédibles. Est-ce de ’arrogance ou de l’ ignorance? En contraste, l’ensemble des études utilisées par l’Agence de réglementation de la lutte antiparasitaire (ARLA) concernant la toxicologie sont des études qui n’ont pas été publiées, non révisées par les pairs et soumis par les industries elles-mêmes. Seulement sept des 118 études ayant servi à évaluer la toxicité du glyphosate ont été en fait publiées, et de ces sept études non-soumises par l’industrie, seulement une a été considérée comme quoi on pouvait s’y fier par l’CIRC (Ecojustice 2015). Ce fait met la lumière sur les idées erronées du Dr. Thompson qui dit que toutes les études considérées par l’ARLA sont crédibles, et des recherches révisées par les pairs.

Ministre Doucet: “Les herbicides à base de glyphosate continuent d’être employés de façon sûre en foresterie et en agriculture dans le monde entier, comme l’indique un examen mené récemment par le médecin-hygiéniste en chef par intérim du Nouveau-Brunswick et le médecin –hygiéniste en chef de la Nouvelle-Ecosse, appuyés par le scientifique principal et directeur général des Sciences de l’Ontario.”

Réponse SSNB: 
SSNB se doit de corriger votre déclaration concernant le médecin-hygiéniste en chef par intérim du NB. Le Dr. Russell ne s’est pas penchée sur la sécurité du glyphosate mais a simplement regardé ce que font d’autres juridictions et la quantité de glyphosate que le NB utilise.
La plupart des études sur lesquelles Santé Canada se basent sont des études de 90 jours effectuées par Monsanto, qui sont des études sur la toxicité et non des études à long terme de l’exposition sur la santé. Celles-ci sont loin d’être concluantes et ne démontrent pas les effets à long terme de l’exposition au glyphosate. En outre, un nombre grandissant de pays ont interdit ou au moins partiellement interdit l’utilisation du glyphosate dû aux préoccupations au niveau de la santé. Ceci inclut l’ Argentine, Malte, les Pays-Bas et Sri Lanka. Le Québec a interdit l’arrosage du Glyphosate sur ses forêts depuis 2001, et la Nouvelle-Écosse ne subventionne plus les industries pour l’arrosage. En 2016, l’Union européenne a refusé la demande de Monsanto de se compromettre pour une extension de 10 ans pour l’utilisation du glyphosate. Suite aux préoccupations exprimées par un nombre grandissant de scientifiques et une pression croissante du public, l’Union européenne a annoncé plutôt une extension de dix-huit mois afin de permettre de faire plus de recherches et de faire l’ examen des études existantes. 
En 2012, le Dr. Gilles-Eric Séralini a publié une étude indépendante dans un journal très respecté qui documentait les effets négatifs liés à l’utilisation du glyphosate sur les rats sur une durée de 700 jours. Les résultats ont montré un taux alarmant de tumeurs et des effets négatifs sur le foie, les reins, et autres organes associés avec le système endocrinien (Séralini 2014). Monsanto a immédiatement répondu en s’organisant pour faire nommer un de ses scientifiques avec aucune expérience en science des plantes ou des pesticides dans un poste « nouvellement » créé à ce journal. Quelques semaines plus tard, l’article du Dr. Séralini a été rétracté par le même journal qui l’avait auparavant jugé appropriée pour publication. L’étude a été republiée en 2014 dans la revue Environmental Sciences Europe, après que la communauté scientifique ait exprimé sa colère envers l’interférence de l’entreprise. Si une corporation multimillionnaire a des tentacules et peut atteindre le monde de la science, ne peut-elle pas aussi atteindre les agences gouvernementales et les décideurs? Un article publié par Antoniou et al. (2012) montre clairement comment le processus de réglementation de la science est ignoré et tourmenté par les pressions de l’industrie. Les Canadiens et les Autochtones semblent avoir très peu confiance dans leurs gouvernements. Peut-être qu’il serait temps d’écouter la population et de renoncer aux manipulations flagrantes de l’industrie et certains secteurs gouvernementaux. Le principe de précaution stipule “qu’en cas de risques de dommages graves ou irréversibles, l’absence de certitude scientifique absolue ne doit pas servir de prétexte pour remettre à plus tard l’adoption de mesures effectives” (Science and Environmental Health Network. Principe de précaution. 11 août,2016, p. 1). Les Québécois ont exprimé leurs préoccupations et le gouvernement du Québec les a écoutés. À ce jour, 27,225 citoyens (5% de la population) du Nouveau-Brunswick ont exprimé leurs préoccupations à l’aide d’une pétition demandant l’interdiction de l’arrosage du glyphosate. Peut-être qu’il serait temps que le gouvernement écoute.

Ministre Doucet: “Je peux vous assurer que le gouvernement et l’industrie forestière évaluent continuellement des moyens de réduire la quantité d’herbicide nécessaire pour lutter efficacement contre la végétation concurrente.”

Réponse SSNB: 
Pourquoi le gouvernement et le secteur forestier n’ invitent-ils pas les groupes environnementaux, les expects en sylviculture, les propriétaires de lots boisés privés et les communautés et parties concernées à faire partie de la table de discussions pour identifier les alternatives à l’arrosage? Ces groupes et individus ont l’expérience, la connaissance, et l’expertise pour participer à ces discussions qui permettraient d’ identifier des alternatives viables aux herbicides. Les gens et groupes consultés ne devraient pas être motivés par la politique ou les avantages financiers mais de fournir l’expertise et des solutions originales.

Ministre Doucet: “Le principe de gestion intégrée de la végétation ainsi que de meilleurs progammes d’éducation et de sensibilisation permettront de dissiper les inquiétudes envers la gestion responsable des forêts.”

Réponse SSNB: 
La quantité de pulvérisation au Nouveau-Brunswick est perçue par le public comme étant dangereuse pour la santé de toutes créatures vivantes, et nous croyons que la quantité utilisée est de loin plus grande que celle déclarée par le gouvernement. Les groupes environnementaux à travers la province sont engagés à faire la promotion et l’éducation et rendre le public conscient de cette menace pour leur bien-être. L’application du principe de précaution entraînerait un moratoire sur l’arrosage d’herbicides, comme le glyphosate, jusqu’à ce qu’une commission indépendante soit apte à déterminer sa sécurité. Ceci donnerait le temps nécessaire pour réviser les études actuelles et indépendantes tout en travaillant en collaboration avec les régions qui ont banni l’usage du Glyphosate. Comme toujours, les groupes environnementaux, les experts en sylviculture, les communautés et parties concernées et les propriétaires de lots boisés privés soutiendraient et fourniraient toute assistance requise pour faciliter cette approche. Il y a beaucoup de gens qui n’ont pas signé la pétition de peur des répercussions de leur employeur. Le jour de l’élection 2018, les électeurs du NB pourraient très bien voter avec leur conscience, derrière l’isoloire, pour un candidat politique qui sera se tenir debout pour ses électeurs. Les groupes environnementaux et autres groupes d’intérêts vont travailler forts pour informer les électeurs à propos de ce qui est avantageux pour eux, leurs enfants et les générations futures.

SSNB et ses alliés demandent une rencontre avec le Ministre le plus tôt possible afin de discuter des questions entourant l’utilisation du glyphosate.

Respectueusement,

Stop Spraying NB (SSNB)

Références:

Gordon B. Bonan. Forests and Climate Change: Forcings, Feedbacks, and the Climate Benefits of Forests.Science 2008 p 1444.

Ecojustice, Canadian Environmental Law Association, Wilderness Committee, Ontario Nature Canadian Physicians for the Environment, Equiterre, David Suzuki Foundation and Friends of the Earth, in a letter to the Honourable Rona Ambrossse, Minister of Health ,Health Canada June 12,2015.

Felton et al. Replacing coniferous monocultures with mixed species production stands: An assessment of the potential benefits for forest biodiversity in northern Europe. Forest Ecology 260, 2010 p. 939.

Guyton, Kathryn et al on behalf of the International Agency for the Research on Cancer Monograph working group March 2015.

FAQS. Science and Environmental Health Network. Precautionary Principle. August 11,2016, p. 1.

Serelini et al. Long term toxicity of a Roundup herbicide and Roundup-tolerant genetically modified maize. Environment Science Europe. 26:14, 2014 pp 3-17.

Results of the OCMOH Action Plan on Glyphosate, A report prepared for the Acting Chief Medical Officer of Health (July 29, 2016) page 6

Antoniou, et al: Teratogenic effects of glyphosate-based herbicides: Divergence of regulatory decisions from scientific evidence. Journal of Environmental and Analytical Toxicology S:4 (2012) 

CONTACTS POUR LES MÉDIAS:
Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, Fredericton: (506)292-7503
Francine Levesque, Kedgwick : (506)284-2769

 

2017-03-22 19:10:02

 

Have a comment about what you just read? Did we get it wrong, or would you like to tell us one of your stories?
Contact us and let us know!


Share the Obsession:

Related Content: